Bruce Rauner

Bruce Rauner Bio, Wife Kids, Email, Salary and Contact

Bruce Rauner(Bruce Vincent Rauner) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and politician who served as the 42nd governor of Illinois, since(2015-2019).

Bruce Rauner Biography

Bruce Rauner(Bruce Vincent Rauner) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and politician who served as the 42nd governor of Illinois, since(2015-2019). Prior to his election, he was also the chairman of R8 Capital Partners and the private equity firm GTCR, based in Chicago. He was the Republican nominee in the 2014 Illinois gubernatorial election and defeated Pat Quinn(Democratic incumbent)by 50.3% to 46.4percent. Himself was defeated in the 2018 gubernatorial election by J. B. Pritzker(Democratic challenger).

 Bruce Rauner Age

He was born on 18th February 1956 in Chicago, IL. He is 63 years old as of 2019.

Bruce Rauner’s Wife 

He is married to Diana Raune and they have six kids together:
Katherine Rauner
Elizabeth Rauner-Brewer
Margaret Rauner
Eric Rauner
Stephanie Rauner
Matthew Rauner

Bruce Rauner Email

https://www2.illinois.gov/gov/contactus/Pages/default.aspx

Bruce Rauner Homes

The owns nine homes across the country.

Bruce Rauner Salary

He earns a salary of $40,000 million of 2018.

Bruce Rauner Sterigenics

After spending the past month downplaying cancer risks from toxic air pollution in west suburban WillowbrookGov. Bruce Rauner on Tuesday joined a chorus of elected officials calling for the shutdown of a Sterigenics International facilityco-owned by his former private equity firm.
Fellow Republicans from DuPage County have been clamoring for Rauner to take more aggressive action against the companywhich for more than three decades has used highly potent ethylene oxide gas to sterilize medical instrumentspharmaceutical drugs, and food near densely populated neighborhoods and several schools.
As recently as Fridaythe most the Republican governor would say aboutSterigenics was that he had instructed the Illinois Environmental ProtectionAgency to launch an investigation.
He changed course after the weekendordered his staff to refer the case Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madiganthe state’s chief lawyerthen urged theDemocrat to seek a court order that would close the Willowbrook facility until a separate federal investigation “Assures the community that resumed operations would not present an elevated health risk.” Rauner’s sudden reversal comes as local politiciansmany of whom like the governor are on the Nov. 6 ballot, face a fury of complaints about a federal report that revealed unusually high cancer risks from ethylene oxide pollution in traditionally Republican communities nearSterigenics.
There is a level of anger in the community that I’ve never seen before,” said longtime state Rep. Jim Durkin of Darienthe House Republican leader and one of several DuPage County officials calling for Sterigenics to be shut down.
This area is populated by young families who are moving here from the city. I know people within a half-mile of the facility who feel they aren’t getting any answers and they don’t feel anybody is standing up on their behalf.” TheTribune previously reported that quick action is unlikely for a variety of reasonsincluding steps the Rauner administration took before and after the Willowbrookcancer report was released to the public in late August.
Almost two months earlierthe Illinois EPA responded to the then-secret report by quietly giving Sterigenics a permit to voluntarily install new pollution-control devicesmaking it more difficult for authorities to pursue legal action against the company unless it can be proved that the fix has failed to eliminate health risks from ethylene oxide pollution.
His appointees later refused to provide Madigan’s office with key documents about the Willowbrook facilityrequired the attorney general’s staff to request the records under the Freedom of Information Act and delayed providing the information until after the Tribune inquired about the dispute on Sept. 20.
Even nowMadigan saidthe state can’t make an effective case againstSterigenics without more air quality monitoring in surrounding neighborhoodsexpert analysis of the results and other information that only the state or federal EPA can provide. The Congressman along with top Trump administration officials at the U.S. EnvironmentalProtection Agency has stressed that there is no evidence Sterigenics poses the type of immediate threats seen in some work settings.
The company has been releasing ethylene oxide into surrounding communities since the early 1980sfederal records showand the health risks involve diseases that can take years to developincluding breast cancerleukemia, and lymphoma.
Based on air samples collected in Mayan arm of the federal Centers forDisease Control and Prevention determined the cancer risks from breathing methylene oxide pollution in southeast DuPage communities could be orders of magnitude higher than initially estimatedup to 6,400 per millionor more than six cases of cancer for every 1,000 people.
Sterigenics said a controlled test of emissionsconducted in late September by consultants hired by the companyfailed to detect any ethylene oxide leaving its pair of buildings in Willowbrook.
We are committed to doing the right thing by our community but closing facilities that emit limitedregulated emissions is not the right answer,” the company said in a statementcalling Rauner’s latest reaction “Ill-considered.” “If necessarywe will take all appropriate actions to protect the hospitals and patients that depend on our facility.” Rauner’s ties to the company date to2011 when a private equity firm he co-founded bought Sterigenics for $675million and immediately expanded its operations.
On Friday morningRauner told radio station WBEZ he no longer has a stake intergenic.
Spokespeople for his campaign and government official later told the Tribune that Rauner sold his interest as part of the 2015 deal but have not produced documents showing the transaction took place.
We will get the truth about what has been emitted so far,” Rauner told the radio station, “And what needs to change in the future.”

Bruce Rauner Contact

Springfield
Office of the Governor
207 State House
Springfield, IL 62706
Phone: 217-782-6830 or 217-782-6831
Chicago
Office of the Governor
James R. Thompson Center
100 W. Randolph, 16-100
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312-814-2121
Governor’s Office of Constituent Affairs Help Line:
Phone: 217-782-0244

Bruce Rauner Campaign

Campaign website

Rauner’s campaign website stated the following:
“ Illinois is worth fighting for
Our state has been held back for decades by the same politicians that have only made government work for themselves, not for the people. We’re working to enact reforms that shake up the broken status quo and return power to the people of Illinois.
The people of our state deserve a government that works for them instead of the politically-connected. With bipartisan reforms, we’ll grow good jobs, deliver value for taxpayers, give every child access to world-class schools, and enact term limits to get rid of career politicians. We’ll make Illinois a state where families and businesses thrive once again. Let’s get to work – because Illinois is worth fighting for.
Standing Up for Taxpayers
Hardworking Illinois taxpayers have been burdened for too long by career politicians who would rather spend your money than do the people’s work. Mike Madigan’s permanent 32 percent income tax hike hurts families and businesses. I’ve proposed a plan to roll back Madigan’s tax hike and give Illinois families a $1 billion tax cut, keeping more money in your pocket and giving a boost to the state’s economy.
For decades, special interests and political insiders controlled Illinois for their benefit and left taxpayers holding the bill. I want to make sure that taxpayers come first, and that state government delivers value for your hard-earned tax dollars. That’s why I was proud to veto Mike Madigan’s permanent 32 percent income tax hike and to have proposed a plan to roll it back with a $1 billion tax cut. And it’s why I’m fighting for lasting property tax relief by freezing property taxes and giving local communities more flexibility to control their costs and lower taxes. We’ve also saved taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars by rooting out fraud, cutting wasteful spending in state operating costs, and negotiating innovative government contracts.
Criminal Justice Reform
Fixing a broken system takes time and consistent effort, which is why my administration is committed to creating lasting reform to address the systemic issues in our criminal justice system.
For too long, an ineffective and counterproductive criminal justice system plagued our state, tearing families apart and hurting communities of color. That’s why I worked to bring Republicans, Democrats, and law enforcement together to begin to fix it.
Unlike past Governors, my priority is on rehabilitation, not dangerous early release programs. In just the past two years, I’ve signed over two-dozen bipartisan criminal justice reform bills. We’re increasing access to job training and opportunities, giving offenders the tools to lead productive lives after they’ve served their time. We’re making the criminal justice system fairer because everyone, no matter their background, deserves to be treated equally before the law.
21st Century Jobs
Entrenched politicians have put a stranglehold on the Illinois economy. I am working to energize our state’s economy, bringing in businesses and creating good-paying jobs.
Illinois’ central location, fertile agriculture lands, and world-class communities, combined with the best, hardest-working people in America means our state should be thriving. We have everything going for us except decades of crony politics and bad policy has held us back. I am working hard to make Illinois more competitive and to help create more good-paying jobs. That means working to lower the cost of doing business by reforming Illinois’ expensive workers’ compensation system, reining in out-of-control lawsuit abuse, and freezing property taxes. It also means modernizing Illinois’ economic development efforts so they move at the speed of business.
Even though the career politicians and special interests are trying to block these reforms, we’ve worked to bring thousands of new, good-paying jobs to Illinois.
We brought nearly 8,000 Amazon jobs to Joliet, Monee, and Romeoville. We brought Rivian Automotive to Normal, where 1,500 jobs will be created. We brought Flex-N-Gate and hundreds of quality jobs to Chicago’s South Side. And with the Future Energy Jobs Act, we are now leading the Midwest in clean energy jobs and will continue to create thousands of new green energy jobs throughout the state in addition to saving thousands of jobs across Illinois.
Cleaning Up Government
Illinois’ career politicians have forgotten the reason they were sent to Springfield: to represent the people of our state. We must enact real reforms to give power back to the people of Illinois – where it belongs.
Illinois’ political system is broken, and it’s going to take real reforms to fix it. Our state is controlled by a political machine and special interests who will do anything to protect the status quo. I’m working to clean up Springfield by getting rid of illegal patronage hires and implementing ethics reforms to stop the revolving door between lobbyists and government. Illinois voters deserve to choose their elected officials, not the other way around. That’s why I’m fighting for term limits and fair maps to make elections more competitive and ensure politicians are genuinely accountable to voters.
Improving Education
Every student in Illinois deserves an education that prepares them for success in college, their careers, and life. We need higher standards, effective funding, and more choice and control for parents and communities.
We’ve fully funded education for the first time in years, increasing K-12 education funding by $1.2 billion, and we brought early childhood education funding to historic levels. And this year, we signed a historic education reform law that provides tax credits for scholarship programs which give educational choice to low-income families, provides more funding for school districts most in need, brings parity in funding for charter schools, and removes onerous state mandates to give local communities more control ”

Bruce Rauner Ad

Bruce Rauner Says that change doBruce Rauner Election

 

Bruce Rauner Election

Illinois’s Gubernatorial Republican Primary Election, 2014

Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Bruce Rauner 328,934 40.1%  
Republican Kirk Dillard 305,120 37.2%  
Republican Bill Brady 123,708 15.1%  
Republican Dan Rutherford 61,948 7.6%  

Illinois’s Gubernatorial Election, 2014

Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Bruce Rauner 1,823,627 50.3%  
Democratic Pat Quinn (inc.) 1,681,343 46.3%  
Libertarian Chad Grimm 121,534 3.4%  
Write-in Scott Summers 684 0.0%  
Write-in Robert “Chico” Perez, Jr. 256 0.0%  
Write-in Mark Smith 134 0.0%  
Write-in Ryan Sweeney 95 0.0%  
Write-in Michael Scruggs 10 0.0%  
Write-in Aaron Merreighn 7 0.0%  

Illinois Gubernatorial Republican primary results, 2018

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

 

Republican Bruce Rauner (incumbent)

361,285

51.4

  Republican Jeanne Ives

341,825

48.6

Total votes

703,110

100

Illinois Gubernatorial Election, 2018

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

  Republican Bruce Rauner (incumbent)

1,723,015

39.2

  Democratic J.B. Pritzker

2,382,536

54.2

  Conservative Sam McCann

188,486

4.3

  Libertarian Kash Jackson

105,480

2.4

Total Votes

4,399,517

100

Bruce Rauner Political Views

Bruce Rauner GBruce Rauner Tax Return

The Governor had more than $91 million in state taxable income in 2016, a significant drop from the $188 million he and wife reported for 2015, according to tax returns the governor’s office released Tuesday.
the governor paid $19.5 million in federal income taxes and $3.2 million in state income taxes for a total tax rate of 25 percent.
The Governor had more than $91 million in state taxable income in 2016, a significant drop from the $188 million he and wife reported for 2015, according to tax returns the governor’s office released Tuesday.
The couple paid $19.5 million in federal income taxes and $3.2 million in state income taxes for a total tax rate of 25 percent.
Governor had more than $91 million in state taxable income in 2016, a significant drop from the $188 million he and wife reported for 2015, according to tax returns the governor’s office released Tuesday.
they paid $19.5 million in federal income taxes and $3.2 million in state income taxes for a total tax rate of 25 percent.
The Governor had more than $91 million in state taxable income in 2016, a significant drop from the $188 million he and wife reported for 2015, according to tax returns the governor’s office released Tuesday.
The Rauner’s paid $19.5 million in federal income taxes and $3.2 million in state income taxes for a total tax rate of 25 percent.

Bruce Rauner News

The Governor. says he talks to the White House by phone “fairly often.” He believes he has “weakened” House Speaker Mike Madigan.
And he insists he can still beat Democrat J.B. Pritzker if only he can “cut through” the millions of dollars the billionaire is using to “cover up a lot of the truth.”
But the Republican governor refuses to say whether he believes President Donald Trump — who ignored the governor at a weekend rally in southern Illinois — has helped or harmed Rauner’s own candidacy.
“The president is not on the ballot. Who is on the ballot is Pritzker and [Illinois House Speaker Mike] Madigan, and then Rauner and [Lt. Governor Evelyn] Sanguinetti,” Rauner said.
As he travels the state to make his final pitch to voters ahead of next week’s election, Rauner invited the Sun-Times onto his campaign bus for a portion of his suburban stops on Tuesday, a first-time move for the incumbent governor.
The governor said he has learned some lessons about how to improve his “messaging,” including spending more time communicating with groups of citizens, meeting one-on-one with the media and using social media more to communicate with people.
He’s in the waning days of a tough re-election battle, and several polls have shown him behind by double digits. And Pritzker is flooding the TV airwaves with millions and millions of dollars worth of campaign ads. Pritzker has broken the national record for self-financing, as first reported by the Chicago Sun-Times, contributing $171.5 million thus far, according to campaign finance records.
Rauner, a former venture capitalist turned politician says “it’s hard to cut through” Pritzker’s advertising onslaught.
“I just don’t have those resources. I made every dollar I’ve ever got and I have put in a huge amount of my net worth. I’ve got to somehow break through the clutter and get to the truth. Because if the truth is known about my opponent, if the truth is known about our policy differences, I firmly believe that we’ll win. But we’ve got to break through all of the false advertising. That’s why I’m sitting with you and getting the truth out.
Rauner called “Pritzker and Madigan being in power together,” a “nightmare for the state,” full of gerrymandered districts and job losses from the corruption, taxes, and regulation.
As for Pritzker’s claim that he doled out millions because Rauner started it first — putting in $50 million in December 2016 the governor called the accusation “ridiculous.”
“He could put in whatever level he wanted, hundred millions more than what I’ve done. That’s so stunningly, it’s in a different league.”
Asked why he didn’t meet with Trump during the president’s weekend rally in Murphysboro, Rauner said they couldn’t make their schedules work and he “had to get back up to Springfield” with “one other stop to make.” He also said his “number one priority” was not to be there for the president, but to help boost support for congressional and legislative candidates.
“We just agreed we’re going to catch up on the phone,” Rauner said. “I was hoping to have the chance, mostly to thank him in person. I talk to the White House on the phone, fairly often. I wanted to thank him in person because what the Trump administration has done to help the people of Illinois on Medicaid and mental health services, $2 billion, and what they’ve done to give us some of the largest transportation grants in Illinois history.”
And he insists he can still beat Democrat J.B. Pritzker if only he can “cut through” the millions of dollars the billionaire is using to “cover up a lot of the truth.”
But the Republican governor refuses to say whether he believes President Donald Trump — who ignored the governor at a weekend rally in southern Illinois — has helped or harmed Rauner’s own candidacy.
“The president is not on the ballot. Who is on the ballot is Pritzker and [Illinois House Speaker Mike] Madigan, and then Rauner and [Lt. Governor Evelyn] Sanguinetti,” Rauner said.
As he travels the state to make his final pitch to voters ahead of next week’s election, Rauner invited the Sun-Times onto his campaign bus for a portion of his suburban stops on Tuesday, a first-time move for the incumbent governor.
The governor said he has learned some lessons about how to improve his “messaging,” including spending more time communicating with groups of citizens, meeting one-on-one with the media and using social media more to communicate with people.
He’s in the waning days of a tough re-election battle, and several polls have shown him behind by double digits. And Pritzker is flooding the TV airwaves with millions and millions of dollars worth of campaign ads. Pritzker has broken the national record for self-financing, as first reported by the Chicago Sun-Times, contributing $171.5 million thus far, according to campaign finance records.
Rauner, a former venture capitalist turned politician says “it’s hard to cut through” Pritzker’s advertising onslaught.
“I just don’t have those resources. I made every dollar I’ve ever got and I have put in a huge amount of my net worth. I’ve got to somehow break through the clutter and get to the truth. Because if the truth is known about my opponent, if the truth is known about our policy differences, I firmly believe that we’ll win. But we’ve got to break through all of the false advertising. That’s why I’m sitting with you and getting the truth out.
Rauner called “Pritzker and Madigan being in power together,” a “nightmare for the state,” full of gerrymandered districts and job losses from the corruption, taxes, and regulation.
As for Pritzker’s claim that he doled out millions because Rauner started it first — putting in $50 million in December 2016 the governor called the accusation “ridiculous.”
“He could put in whatever level he wanted, hundred millions more than what I’ve done. That’s so stunningly, it’s in a different league.”
Asked why he didn’t meet with Trump during the president’s weekend rally in Murphysboro, Rauner said they couldn’t make their schedules work and he “had to get back up to Springfield” with “one other stop to make.” He also said his “number one priority” was not to be there for the president, but to help boost support for congressional and legislative candidates.
“We just agreed we’re going to catch up on the phone,” Rauner said. “I was hoping to have the chance, mostly to thank him in person. I talk to the White House on the phone, fairly often. I wanted to thank him in person because what the Trump administration has done to help the people of Illinois on Medicaid and mental health services, $2 billion, and what they’ve done to give us some of the largest transportation grants in Illinois he says he talks to the White House by phone “fairly often.” He believes he has “weakened” House Speaker Mike Madigan.
And he insists he can still beat Democrat J.B. Pritzker if only he can “cut through” the millions of dollars the billionaire is using to “cover up a lot of the truth.”
But the Republican governor refuses to say whether he believes President Donald Trump — who ignored the governor at a weekend rally in southern Illinois — has helped or harmed Rauner’s own candidacy.
“The president is not on the ballot. Who is on the ballot is Pritzker and [Illinois House Speaker Mike] Madigan, and then Rauner and [Lt. Governor Evelyn] Sanguinetti,” Rauner said.
As he travels the state to make his final pitch to voters ahead of next week’s election, Rauner invited the Sun-Times onto his campaign bus for a portion of his suburban stops on Tuesday, a first-time move for the incumbent governor.
The governor said he has learned some lessons about how to improve his “messaging,” including spending more time communicating with groups of citizens, meeting one-on-one with the media and using social media more to communicate with people.
He’s in the waning days of a tough re-election battle, and several polls have shown him behind by double digits. And Pritzker is flooding the TV airwaves with millions and millions of dollars worth of campaign ads. Pritzker has broken the national record for self-financing, as first reported by the Chicago Sun-Times, contributing $171.5 million thus far, according to campaign finance records.
Rauner, a former venture capitalist turned politician says “it’s hard to cut through” Pritzker’s advertising onslaught.
“I just don’t have those resources. I made every dollar I’ve ever got and I have put in a huge amount of my net worth. I’ve got to somehow break through the clutter and get to the truth. Because if the truth is known about my opponent, if the truth is known about our policy differences, I firmly believe that we’ll win. But we’ve got to break through all of the false advertising. That’s why I’m sitting with you and getting the truth out.
Rauner called “Pritzker and Madigan being in power together,” a “nightmare for the state,” full of gerrymandered districts and job losses from the corruption, taxes, and regulation.
As for Pritzker’s claim that he doled out millions because Rauner started it first — putting in $50 million in December 2016 the governor called the accusation “ridiculous.”
“He could put in whatever level he wanted, hundred millions more than what I’ve done. That’s so stunningly, it’s in a different league.”
Asked why he didn’t meet with Trump during the president’s weekend rally in Murphysboro, Rauner said they couldn’t make their schedules work and he “had to get back up to Springfield” with “one other stop to make.” He also said his “number one priority” was not to be there for the president, but to help boost support for congressional and legislative candidates.
“We just agreed we’re going to catch up on the phone,” Rauner said. “I was hoping to have the chance, mostly to thank him in person. I talk to the White House on the phone, fairly often. I wanted to thank him in person because what the Trump administration has done to help the people of Illinois on Medicaid and mental health services, $2 billion, and what they’ve done to give us some of the largest transportation grants in Illinois history.”

Bruce Rauner Interview

He says he talks to the White House by phone “fairly often.” He believes he has “weakened” House Speaker Mike Madigan.
And he insists he can still beat Democrat J.B. Pritzker if only he can “cut through” the millions of dollars the billionaire is using to “cover up a lot of the truth.”
But the Republican governor refuses to say whether he believes President Donald Trump — who ignored the governor at a weekend rally in southern Illinois — has helped or harmed Rauner’s own candidacy.
“The president is not on the ballot. Who is on the ballot is Pritzker and [Illinois House Speaker Mike] Madigan, and then Rauner and [Lt. Governor Evelyn] Sanguinetti,” Rauner said.
As he travels the state to make his final pitch to voters ahead of next week’s election, Rauner invited the Sun-Times onto his campaign bus for a portion of his suburban stops on Tuesday, a first-time move for the incumbent governor.
The governor said he has learned some lessons about how to improve his “messaging,” including spending more time communicating with groups of citizens, meeting one-on-one with the media and using social media more to communicate with people.
He’s in the waning days of a tough re-election battle, and several polls have shown him behind by double digits. And Pritzker is flooding the TV airwaves with millions and millions of dollars worth of campaign ads. Pritzker has broken the national record for self-financing, as first reported by the Chicago Sun-Times, contributing $171.5 million thus far, according to campaign finance records.
Rauner, a former venture capitalist turned politician says “it’s hard to cut through” Pritzker’s advertising onslaught.
“I just don’t have those resources. I made every dollar I’ve ever got and I have put in a huge amount of my net worth. I’ve got to somehow break through the clutter and get to the truth. Because if the truth is known about my opponent, if the truth is known about our policy differences, I firmly believe that we’ll win. But we’ve got to break through all of the false advertising. That’s why I’m sitting with you and getting the truth out.
Rauner called “Pritzker and Madigan being in power together,” a “nightmare for the state,” full of gerrymandered districts and job losses from the corruption, taxes, and regulation.
As for Pritzker’s claim that he doled out millions because Rauner started it first — putting in $50 million in December 2016 the governor called the accusation “ridiculous.”
“He could put in whatever level he wanted, hundred millions more than what I’ve done. That’s so stunningly, it’s in a different league.”
Asked why he didn’t meet with Trump during the president’s weekend rally in Murphysboro, Rauner said they couldn’t make their schedules work and he “had to get back up to Springfield” with “one other stop to make.” He also said his “number one priority” was not to be there for the president, but to help boost support for congressional and legislative candidates.
“We just agreed we’re going to catch up on the phone,” Rauner said. “I was hoping to have the chance, mostly to thank him in person. I talk to the White House on the phone, fairly often. I wanted to thank him in person because what the Trump administration has done to help the people of Illinois on Medicaid and mental health services, $2 billion, and what they’ve done to give us some of the largest transportation grants in Illinois history.”

Bruce Rauner Twitter

https://twitter.com/govrauner 

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Cooper Noriega was an American TikTok Star. He gained fame with his entertaining lip-sync, POV, and comedy clips. In addition, the world and his sudden death shocks his fans. He is trending on Twitter and Google.

David Asman Bio, Wiki, FNC, Age, Education, Height, Family, Wife, Children, and Career

David Asman is a skilled American journalist currently working at Fox News Channel as an Anchor. He joined (FNC) in 1997. In addition, he aided in launching FOX Business Network (FBN) in 2007.

Dan Godwin Bio, Wiki, FOX 4, Age, Education, Family, Children, Wife, Net Worth, and Career

Dan Godwin is an accomplished American journalist who is currently working as Reporter/Anchor at FOX 4. He was born and grew up in Southern California, in a town called Calabasas. He spent a lot of summer days at nearby Zuma Beach, not actually surfing, but hoping to give that impression.